Soul Illuminance: a Retrospective of Quest Skinner

Soul Illuminance: A Retrospective of Quest Skinner

EXHIBITION OPENING:

Get Tickets HERE

North Brentwood, MD (January 30, 2019) –   The Prince George’s African American Museum and Cultural Center (PGAAMCC) is proud to announce the exhibition opening of Soul Illuminance: A Retrospective of Quest Skinner Friday, February, 8, 6-9pm. Join us and experience the dreamscapes, divine feminine representation, alchemy and abstraction that is Quest Skinner’s work.

Enter the surrealist dreamscape of lush textures and inner visions of internationally acclaimed artist, Quest Skinner. As a DC based artist, her influences range from the energy of cityscapes, music and people she encounters every day to the Burning Man festival, indigenous culture and the divine feminine. Her studio practice involves alchemy, taking raw feelings, vibrations and moments in our lives to transmute and reincarnate them with resin, paint, collage, sculpture and over 30 other mediums she works in. Quest’s artwork is a mixed media tapestry of flowing pigment and vibrant color, which tells a story that demands to be seen, changing with every person who sees her work. ‘Art is the poor man's bar of gold… We are here to create and be creatives and creators.’ Quest Skinner

Quest has spent years selling her art at Eastern Market in Downtown DC. She takes pride in selling original art work and her clients always walk away with a one of a kind original, rather than manufactured prints. As a result, every year, she changes her style to reflect one year of experiences, creating 50 to 150 pieces per week, and selling nearly half of what she produced per weekend at Eastern Market. She continues to evolve with her work, and the art in our galleries are an extension of Quest Skinner’s 2018 collection.

Quest’s goal is to paint reflections of fierce, fancy, and unapologetic femininity. ‘Men are not our beasts of burden, and we should not treat them as such’. Her depictions seek to challenge the societal norms that suggest that men and women have equal footing in relationships, the workplace, and within their own identities. This idea is manifested with images of warrior women slaying dragons, ballerinas and dancers striking a pose, and intricate body busts of the male and female anatomy. In addition, the dirty pour style creates lush abstract art that can be interpreted and viewed dynamically in a reading of the ink blots.

Curated by PGAAMCC Executive Director Monica Montgomery, the exhibition creates conversations between historical and contemporary artists of diverse cultural backgrounds exploring a broad range of themes including the body, identity, materiality, and private versus public selves.

The Prince George’s African American Museum and Cultural Center is recognized nationally and internationally for its innovative approach to the documentation, interpretation, preservation, and presentation of local and regional African American history, art, and culture. PGAAMCC is open Tuesday through Saturday, 10am-5pm.  Admission to the museum is free. For more information, call (301) 809-0440, email programs@pgaamcc.org, or visit the Museum’s website at www.pgaamcc.org.


Creative Culture, Vol. 1 - Black Love

CREATIVE CULTURE, Vol. 1 - Black Love. Live Performances by Aaron Abernathy with Special Guests Anastasia Antoinette and Brian Jones.

About this Event

First Fridays – PGAAMCC X Creative Culture

The Prince George’s African American Museum and Cultural Center in conjunction with Creative Culture, brings to you a celebration of artistry. Historically, the preservation of art that informs or symbolizes a culture, occupies a sacred space within our society. Museums are a way of preserving and highlighting our history and a journey to a museum often allows us to transport ourselves to another time and place, forgetting the cares of the current world. The same can be said of art – it preserves and transports us while at the same time giving life to a physical, musical or visual representation of an emotion or thought. With art, we can lose ourselves in its beauty, be informed by a creation or allow the art to transform us in some way. Through art we can uplift and inspire. Through art we can open minds and reframe opinions. Through art we can tell a story that builds a bridge between cultures, not a wall.

How our culture infuses our collective psyche giving rise to performance artists creating more unique art, is the creative space through which we aim to highlight artists. Our goal is to give a safe performance space for the creative cultural juxtaposition of art, social commentary, political explorations and matters of the heart. We seek to showcase culture in dynamic tandem with gifted artists performing across a variety of mediums. Come out and support these artists the first Friday of every month as they showcase their range of skills. Along with a changing line-up of live performances, local food & drink vendors will be on site bringing a myriad of flavors to the party. Additionally, a variety of local retail brands will be present. February is Black History month and the First Friday performance on February 1st will celebrate Black Love. Network, be inspired or simply come to enjoy local performers. To support and register for each Creative Culture First Friday events at PGAAMCC, please visit CreativeCulture.Live.

Get Tickets HERE!


Ujamaa Jam

We are so excited to announce our upcoming Kwanzaa Celebration pop-up: Ujamaa Art Jam!

Celebrate communal exchange and cooperative economics at our Ujamaa Art Jam. Feel the Kwanzaa vibes, as we curate a pop up you’ll love, with great buys, good food, live entertainment and cultural excitement. End your Holiday’s on a High Note #ForTheCulture at the Prince George’s African American Museum

Ujamaa – Cooperative Economics “To build our own businesses, control the economics of our own community and share in all its work and wealth. Nguzo Saba Kwanzaa Principle #4

For more information click here!


Welcome our new Executive Director, Monica O Montgomery

PGAAMCC Welcome's our new Executive Director, Monica O Montgomery

Photo credit: Dominique Sindayiganza

Monica O. Montgomery, is the new Executive Director of Prince Georges African American Museum and Cultural Center. She is an arts and culture innovator using creativity and narrative as a means of bridging the gap between people and movements. As an independent curator, museum consultant and  keynote speaker, she uses her platforms to be in service to society. She is co-founder and strategic director of Museum Hue a multicultural platform advancing diversity, equity & inclusion initiatives for people of color, in arts, culture, museums and creative economy. She works internationally to facilitate diversity, equity & inclusion initiatives with clients throughout Europe, Africa and North America.

As a museum activist, Monica advocates globally for social justice and relevance embedded in museum practice. She is a dynamic force for change, recently delivering a TedX talk entitled ‘How To Be an Upstander’ challenging everyone to stand up, speak up and act up for social good.

She holds a Bachelors of Arts in Broadcast Communication from Temple University and a Masters of Arts in Corporate Communication from LaSalle University. She is an adjunct professor who’s taught in Museum Studies graduate programs at Harvard University, Pratt Institute, and NYU and guest lectured at Princeton University, Columbia University, American University, Johns Hopkins University, University of Pennsylvania, CUNY, University of the Arts and dozens more. Monica holds leadership advisory positions in OfByFor All Change Network, NYC Arts in Education Roundtable, Leading Changemakers, Arts Marketing Association UK, Museums As Sites of Social Action and other groups.

Monica states” I am grateful and energized to be named Executive Director of Prince Georges African American Museum and Cultural Center, an institution that stands out among African American museums for presenting bold contemporary art exhibitions and preserving the black history contributions of residents in PG County. My commitment to Diversity + Inclusion, Black excellence, Social justice curation and community engagement has led to a natural progression of my work into this esteemed leadership position. I am honored to be taking the helm and excited by the possibilities PGAAMCC has to leave a lasting legacy for future generations throughout the region and the world.”


From County to State: New Executive Leadership at Two Partnering African American Institutions

PHOTO RIGHT TO LEFT.  Dr. Donald Wallace Jones, PGAAMCC Chair; Maleke Glee, Interim Director; Chanel Compton, MCAAHC/BDM Director; Lyndra Marshall (née Pratt), MCAAHC Chair

From County to State: New Executive Leadership at Two Partnering African American Institutions

Chanel Compton named Director of the Maryland Commission on African American History and Culture and the Banneker Douglass Museum and Maleke Glee named Interim Executive Director for the Prince George’s African American Museum & Cultural Center

The Prince George’s African American Museum & Cultural Center (PGAAMCC) and the Maryland Commission on African American History and Culture (MCAAHC) and the Banneker-Douglass Museum (BDM) are in the midst of bringing on new leadership to both organizations.  PGAAMCC’s current Executive Director, Chanel Compton, was recruited by the MCAAHC to be the new Director of the MCAAHC and BDM in Annapolis.  Ms. Compton will also transition to the PGAAMCC Board of Directors as the Vice Chair of Development.  PGAAMCC has recruited Maleke Glee, previously a program/community partner, to be the Interim Executive Director. “My primary goal, as Board Chair, is to continue to elevate the excellent programs, practices, and procedures of PGAAMCC,” states Dr. Donald Wallace Jones, Chair of PGAAMCC’s Board of Directors “We are very pleased to have Ms. Compton transition from serving as our Executive Director to being an acting Board Member as the Vice Chair of Development.  As such a strong ambassador for PGAAMCC, Ms. Compton will actively promote our mission and vision locally, nationally, and internationally.” Both organizations seeks to partner on Board Membership and program initiatives.  Ms. Lyndra Marshall (née Pratt), MCAAHC Chair states, “Though both institutions are in transition, this has been a great opportunity to collaborate through staffing, volunteerism, board leadership, and program initiatives.”

About PGAAMCC and MCAAHC

PGAAMCC’s mission is to celebrate and inspire the community through the cultivation, preservation, and presentation of the cultural and artistic contributions of African Americans in Prince George’s County, Maryland.  Since opening its doors in 2010, PGAAMCC has presented art and historical exhibitions, public programs, film screenings, festivals, and educational outreach programs, all of which continue to grow as the Museum’s audience and reach expand.  In partnership with the Prince George’s County Public School (PGCPS) Office of Arts Integration, PGAAMCC’s education outreach programs, such as its early childhood programs and teen after school programs, serve approximately 65 PGPCS schools and 4,000 PGCPS students. Moving forward, PGAAMCC is actively expanding its education outreach programs throughout the region and is producing a Black Arts Festival, which will premiere on October 7, 2017.

PGAAMCC’s new Interim Executive Director, Maleke Glee, is no stranger to PGAAMCC and community arts programming.  Glee’s scholarship is focused on dramaturgy and cultural ethnography, and he recently curated PGAAMCC’s most popular public programs series for the exhibition, Chocolate Cities. Maleke has also led PGAAMCC’s after school program, Culture Keepers, and is the founder and executive director for the DC based non-profit, Chocolate Redux, whose mission is to support and sustain the local culture of the Washington Metropolitan Area in the midst of gentrification. Maleke Glee states“ As a native and current resident of the County, I am honored to support our cultural eco-system.  I enter this role ready to work alongside the Board, partners, and community, to fulfill the promise of PGAAMCC’s mission.”

The Maryland Commission on African American History and Culture (MCAAHC) works to interpret, document, preserve, and promote Maryland's African American heritage; to provide technical assistance to institutions and groups with similar objectives; and to educate Maryland's citizens and visitors about the significance of the African American experience in Maryland and the nation.  MCAAHC oversees the Banneker Douglass Museum, appoints the Walter Hill Fellowship in Archives, and jointly administers the States $1-million African American Heritage Preservation Grant Program with the Maryland Historical Trust. Chanel Compton states, “Serving African American causes on a County level has been a tremendous experience, and I am honored to serve on a State level to further promote the preservation and presentation of African American history, art, and culture.”

The Future

As two of Maryland State’s premiere African American institutions, alongside institutions such as the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of African American History and Culture and the National Great Blacks in Wax Museum in Baltimore, PGAAMCC and MCAAHC seek to be resources to each other and the greater community through cross-institutional board leadership and creative collaborations, such as traveling exhibitions and programs.

To learn more about MCAAHC, please visit www.africanamerican.maryland.gov or call 410-216-6180.  To learn more about PGAAMCC, please visit www.pgaamcc.org or call 301-809-0440.


Call for Artists

CALL FOR ARTISTS

Fall 2016 Exhibit: Through Their Eyes- Art, Education, and Influence: Creative Expressions Inspired by Prince George’s County CVPA Alumni”

Duration: October 12- Friday January 20

Submission Deadline: August 31

 

PROPOSALS

 “Through Their Eyes- Art, Education, and Influence: Creative Expressions Inspired by Prince George’s County CVPA Alumni” showcases the work of select alumni of the visual arts programs at Suitland High School and Northwestern High School. We are seeking art works and other narrative expressions inspired by curricula, teachers, pedagogical approaches, peer interactions, overall CVPA program experiences, and the schools themselves.

 

ELIGIBILITY

This call is open to:

  • All artists who are aged 18 years or older.
  • Of African origin/descent
  • Attended or graduated from the Center for Visual & Performing Arts at either Suitland High School or Northwestern High School

Alumni Call for Artists Invite

FOR MORE INFORMATION:

Contact Laura Perez, Director of Education and Programs at

301-809-0440 ext 110

lperez@pgaamcc.org


"District 3 Day" at The Museum

After grey skies and only the threat of a major thunderstorm, the last day of May turned out to be a rain free, great way to end the month.  PGAAMCC was the scene of the first ever Day Out At the Museum event. Hosted by Council Member Dannielle M. Glaros, District 3 residents came out to experience, expand, explore…in the Gateway Arts District.  This was a private event and an opportunity to connect residents and businesses to resources.

In addition to viewing the museums newest exhibit, Patented Ingenuity: The Art of African American Inventors, which runs through September 12, 2015, those in attendance shared their stories throughout the afternoon from the Lakeland Community, Lincoln community, and the community of Seabrook Acres.

The museum’s North Brentwood location is a museum for all Districts and we encourage all Council Members to host events.  Thank you Council Member Glaros for bringing District 3 stories to PGAAMCC!


Women's History Month

Did you know that International Women's day is celebrated on March 8th and the first International Women's Day was held on March 19, 1911?

Learn more about Women's History Month here.


In Memoriam: Marion Barry

"Mayor for Life"

Civil rights activist, Marion Barry is the definition of a game changer.  Since his move to Washington, D.C. in 1965, he managed to become one of the most influential, charismatic, and unforgettable politicians of his time. Although Marion Barry is greatly known for being the second and fourth mayor of Washington, D.C., he was the first chair of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee and the President of the D.C. School Board (1972-1974). He also held a seat as a member of the D.C. City Council three times. Marion Barry co-founded PRIDE, Inc. in 1967 and started the D.C. Summer Youth Program in 1979. His dedication and commitment was displayed through his many efforts to improve the city he called home. Marion Barry’s life was a testimony that despite your flaws, mistakes, and imperfections; you can still positively impact and inspire your community.

Prince George’s African American Museum and Cultural Center would like to take a moment to pay homage to the former Mayor of the District of Columbia, City Council member, D.C. School Board President, and civil rights activist, Marion S. Barry.


'The Historymakers' Lauds Dr. Jacqueline F. Brown

The Historymakers, 'the nation's largest African American oral history collection' recently added the distinguished life and career of our very on Executive Director, Dr. Jacqueline F. Brown, to their archive.

Who knew that chocolate brown was her favorite color? Or, that Chocolate and Tuna Fish were among here favorite foods? What we at PGAAMCC probably could have guessed was her favorite quote: 'No problem is solved at the same level of consciousness that created it'. That's was she does everyday--elevate consciousness. And we are all better for it!

Read excerpts from her 2007 Historymaker's Interview for yourself, visit: http://www.thehistorymakers.com/biography/jacqueline-finney-brown-41